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M1832 Shako Uniform Cap

A rare example of an M1832 enlisted soldier's Shako—designated as a uniform cap by the Army—it replaced the earlier M1821 bell crown cap. The new design was based on the French infantry cap of the period. The Shako was primarily worn as a dress item and the M1832 was used until 1851 when the Army began replacing them with a new design.

This Shako is made of wool felt and measures seven and one half inches from crown to top and has a convex visor. The visor and reinforcing bands are made of leather. An officer's shako was made of beaver with a large flat visor to distinguish it from those worn by enlisted soldiers. The brass insignia consists of an eagle, a number "4" and crossed cannons. These identify the cap to the 4th Artillery Regiment. The brass plume holder (tulip) probably held a light artillery red horsehair plume. A label inside the cap identifies Horstmann Co., Philadelphia, as the supplier.

Although regulation 1832 caps are rare, the red cords and tassels indicate this cap belonged to the regiment's light artillery company. Light artillery companies wore a mix of dragoon and artillery uniform components, which set them apart from the more common foot artillerymen.

M1832 Shako Uniform Cap

M1832 Shako Uniform Cap