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U.S. Army Museum of Hawaii

About

U.S. Army Museum of Hawaii at Fort DeRussy was established in 1976 and is housed inside Battery Randolph, a former coast artillery fortification that mounted two 14-inch disappearing rifled guns. The U.S. Army Museum of Hawaii honors, interprets, communicates, and presents the history of the Army in the Pacific centered on Hawaii's contributions to our nation's defense and its Army heritage through exhibits, educational programs, and the preservation of historic material.

Exhibits

The museum collects and displays artifacts, photographs, and ephemeral pieces with provenance to the following: pre-European Hawaiian warfare, Hawaii-based coastal artillery defenses, and materials related to Army bases in Hawaii. The museum also collects and displays artifacts relevant to Army engagements in the Pacific theater of operations, Hawaii-based Army units and their missions, and exceptional citizens of Hawaii who have served honorably in the United States Army. While the museum storyline currently covers a broad history of events, dating from pre-European Hawaiian warfare through the Vietnam conflict, the museum collection also includes artifacts dating from the post-Vietnam era through today.

History

Established in 1976, the U.S. Army Museum of Hawaii is one of approximately 64 museums owned and operated by the U.S. Army. Despite an annual visitor attendance of more than 100,000 per year, a majority being tourists from all over the world, the true mission of Army Museums are to train and educate Army Soldiers about their history and material culture.

The U.S. Army Museum of Hawaii is housed inside Battery Randolph, a former coast artillery fortification that mounted two, 14-inch disappearing rifled guns. It was the first line of defense against an enemy naval attack on the south shore of Oahu. When the guns were emplaced here, they were the largest guns in the entire Pacific – from California to the Philippines. The guns were never challenged or fired in anger.

Museum exhibits tell the story of the U.S. Army in Hawaii and the Pacific area, the military history of Hawaii, and the contributions made by Hawaii and Hawaii’s citizens to the nation’s defense. Key exhibits include the military organizations of the Hawaiian monarchy, Coast Artillery in Hawaii, Hawaii’s critical role in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam, the Go For Broke Nisei Soldiers, the General Shinseki Gallery, and a Gallery of Heroes to honor all citizens of Hawaii who earned our nation’s two highest awards for valor.

A photo archive of more than 20,000 images is available for reprints. Museum staff is available to assist with historical inquiries and research.

The U.S. Army Museum of Hawaii is operated by the U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii and serves both the military and civilian community. The museum is authorized and certified by the Commanding General, U.S. Army Center of Military History.

Our mission is to collect, preserve, exhibit and interpret artifacts that reflect the history of the U.S. Army in Hawaii and the Pacific area, the military history of Hawaii, and the contributions made by Hawaii and Hawaii’s citizens to the nation’s defense. As an educational institution, the museum supports training and education for the military and civilians.

Visiting the Museum

Admission Free

Hours

Monday Closed
Tuesday 1000 1700
Wednesday 1000 1700
Thursday 1000 1700
Friday 1000 1700
Saturday 1000 1700
Sunday Closed

Closed on Sunday, Monday and all Federal Holidays except Veterans Day.

From Central Waikiki (Driving)

  • Head north (inland, or mauka) to Ala Wai Boulevard, a one-way street that runs northwest along the Ala Wai Canal. Stay in the left lane.
  • After Pau Street, turn left on Niu Street. Niu Street, one block long, technically ends at the next intersection with Kalakaua Avenue, but you will want to go straight across onto Ala Moana Boulevard.
  • You will see Ft. DeRussy on your left.
  • Get into the left lane, and at the next light, turn left onto Kalia Road.
  • You will pass the Hilton Hawaiian Village, then the Hale Koa Hotel. The road narrows and winds gently. After about 100 yards, you should see the Hawai'i Army Museum on your right (look for the sign, and the tanks and cannons in front of the building). However, parking is across the street on the left.

From Central Waikiki (Walking)

  • Get onto Kalakaua Avenue, the main street in Waikiki, and start walking northwest (against traffic).
  • Turn left at Saratoga Road (note that streets in Hawai'i often change names as they cross each other - if you hit Kalaimoku Street you've gone too far). You should now be heading southwest (toward the ocean or makai).
  • When Saratoga Road ends, turn right on Kalia Road. The U.S. Army Museum will be right there, near the intersection.

From West/Central O'ahu

  • Get onto H-1 East.
  • After you pass the Isenberg Street and University Avenue exits, get off at the King Street exit (Exit 25A).
  • Go straight at the first light, passing the Foodland supermarket (it will be on your right), and turn right onto Kapahulu Avenue (the second light, which is under the freeway).
  • Follow Kapahulu Avenue all the way down (south, toward the ocean, or makai, about a mile and a half), staying in the right lane. Watch for Herbert and Kainana Streets on your left, then a water pumping station and the Waikiki Library on your right.
  • Turn right onto Ala Wai Boulevard. (A right-turn lane will begin in front of the library, which will take you to the right of a large plant-and-waterfall traffic island.)
  • From here, follow the directions for "From Central Waikiki (Driving)" above.

From East O'ahu

  • Get onto H-1 West. After you pass the Waialae Avenue and Kapiolani Boulevard exits, get off at the King Street exit (Exit 25A).
  • Make an immediate left (no light, opposite the Hawaii Humane Society on the right).
  • Negotiate the merge with traffic coming off H-1 West, go straight at the first light (passing the Foodland supermarket on your right), and turn right onto Kapahulu Avenue (the second light, which is under the freeway).
  • Follow Kapahulu Avenue all the way down (south, toward the ocean, or makai, about a mile and a half), staying in the right lane. Watch for Herbert and Kainana Streets on your left, then a water pumping station and the Waikiki Library on your right.
  • Turn right onto Ala Wai Boulevard. (A right-turn lane will begin in front of the library, which will take you to the right of a large plant-and-waterfall traffic island.) From here, follow the directions for "From Central Waikiki (Driving)" above.
U.S. Army Museum of Hawaii
Fort DeRussy
2131 Kalia Road
Honolulu, Hawaii 96815

Contact Us

U.S. Army Museum of Hawaii
P.O. Box 8088
Honolulu, Hawaii 96830-0088

Museum Email: usarmy.derussy.tradoc.mbx.cmh-museum-of-hawaii-inquiries@mail.mil